Home Technology Google, Microsoft and OpenAI to make voluntary commitments on AI safety at White House

Google, Microsoft and OpenAI to make voluntary commitments on AI safety at White House

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Google, Microsoft and OpenAI to make voluntary commitments on AI safety at White House

Google, Microsoft and several AI labs, including OpenAI, are making voluntary commitments to place limits on AI technology.

Executives from seven leading AI companies will meet at the White House on Friday to pledge increase security testing of their systems and develop ways for the public to easily identify AI-generated content in an agreement secured by the Biden administration. The voluntary commitments come as policymakers are engaging with AI companies over how to encourage responsible growth of the emerging technology.

“Since taking office, President Biden, Vice President Harris, and the entire Biden-Harris administration have moved with urgency to seize the tremendous promise and manage the risk posed by artificial intelligence and to protect the American people,” a White House official said.

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In this photo illustration, the OpenAI “ChatGPT” AI-generated answer to the question “What can AI offer to humanity?” (Leon Neal/Getty Images / Getty Images)

Amazon, Anthropic, Inflection and Meta are the other companies participating in the White House event. Each of these companies has committed to: 

  • Conduct internal and external security testing of their AI systems before release, with the aid of independent experts;
  • Share information across the industry with governments, civil society and academia to manage AI risks and establish best practices for safety;
  • Facilitate third-party discovery and reporting of vulnerabilities in their AI systems;
  • Develop a means for consumers to identify AI-generated content, such as through watermarks;
  • Publicly report on their AI systems’ capabilities, limitations and areas of appropriate and inappropriate use;
  • Prioritize research on the risks AI can pose to society, including how to avoid harmful bias and discrimination and protect privacy;
  • Develop and deploy AI with the intent to combat climate change, advance health care and take on “society’s greatest challenges.”

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ChatGPT and Bard AI

Google Bard versus OpenAI ChatGPT displayed on Mobile with Openai and Google logo on screen seen in this photo illustration Feb. 7, 2023 in Brussels. (Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty Images / Getty Images)

Mitigating the risks of AI technology has been a top concern for industry leaders and policymakers since OpenAI released its revolutionary ChatGPT system in November 2022. The chatbot replies to text inputs and can simulate conversations on various topics, create lyrics or tell stories in response to prompts, asssist with outline, suggest edits to computer code and more. Other versions of so-called generative AI can produce complex and photo-realistic images or convincingly replicate people’s voices.

Companies and investors are spending billions of dollars to push the technology further, with some experts saying the changes AI will bring to society will be as transformative as the Industrial Revolution.

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U.S. President Joe Biden

President Biden secured voluntary commitments from seven leading AI companies to prioritize safety, security and trustworthiness in AI development. (AP Newsroom)

However, with great promise comes great risk, as leaders in the industry have cautioned. In an open letter in May, industry leaders, scientists and professors wrote that “mitigating the risk of extinction from AI should be a global priority alongside other societal-scale risks such as pandemics and nuclear war.” 

This agreement, secured by President Biden, is part of a larger effort to ensure AI technology continues to grow but with appropriate safeguards to prevent abuse. Congressional lawmakers have also held several meetings with industry experts in recent months to consider regulations that may be necessary to protect consumers.

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Those attending the White House meeting on Friday are Amazon Web Services CEO Adam Selipsky, Anthropic CEO Dario Amodei, Google head of global affairs Kent Walker, Inflection CEO Mustafa Suleyman, Meta head of global affairs Nick Clegg, Microsoft President Brad Smith and OpenAI President Greg Brockman.

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